Nov - Dec 2012

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Robert Lefkowitz [All photos by Chris Hildreth]
YOU’VE JUST WON THE NOBEL PRIZE.Congratulations! So what’s the first thing you do?If you’re Duke’s Robert Lefkowitz, you start sorting through those... Read more
On the first day of his marine conservation course this past January, Martin Smith told his eight undergraduates that they would play a game. One... Read more
Phone scan: Bradley's cell-phone picture of Tsipis' MRI, which shows a large white area where a stroke cut off circulation in his brain. [Courtesy Kendall Bradley]
Kendall Bradley ’11 checked her phone and gave herself thirty-five minutes to fall apart. She’d left Nick in the gaping mouth of an MRA machine, his... Read more
It was seventy degrees outside, and my hands were completely numb. I was leaning belly-first against a steep, 13,000-foot mountain slope in Colorado’... Read more

Nov - Dec 2012

Departments

The Quad

  • Lessons from Buck: Trustee David Rubenstien evoked the spirit of James B. Duke during the keynote address at the annual Founders' Day ceremony in Duke Chapel. Credit: Megan Moor
David M. Rubenstein ’70 was seeking a little inspiration. What he found, he told a packed Duke Chapel on Founders’ Day, was a message from beyond: a hopeful vision for Duke’s prolonged success.In...
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“This is a great course and I am excited it is only the beginning.”“You have no idea how much this course is affecting me on a very personal level.”“I’m highly impressed and grateful for education...
  • Right where he belongs: Duke undergraduate student Jamal Edwards with fellow first-year students on Duke's East Campus. Credit: Megan Moor
When Jamal Edwards ’16 was admitted to Duke during the early-decision period last fall, the California native was so excited that he couldn’t wait to get to campus. But as enrollment neared, he says...
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Duke’s annual Career Fair often can resemble a trading floor, with its chaotic buzz of sharply dressed young men and women in search of a deal. Despite the shaky economy and a weak job market, this...
  • Chain-link canvas: Attendees at the Arts Annex opening reception create a living mural by decorating a fence with materials provided by Durham's Scrap Exchange. Credit: Jared Lazarus
Inspiring is hardly the word most alumni would assign to the old Duke Linen Service Center, a nondescript warehouse off Campus Drive near East Campus. Gray and spare, the building befits its...
  • Modern master: Matisse in his apartment at the Place Charles-Felix in Nice, 1934. Photo courtesy of the Henri Matisse Archive.
In the early years of the twentieth century, the Parisian cognoscenti sniffed at avant-garde artists Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso. But Claribel and Etta Cone, sisters from Baltimore, bought their...
  • Meeting a need: Momber hopes to work with underserved communities. Credit: Megan Moor
After frustrating stints as a paralegal and as an intern at an engineering firm, Kevin Momber was looking for meaningful work where he could make a difference in people’s lives. Inspired by a friend...
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One of the most potent sources of growth in the U.S. hightech economy has been foreign brainpower. Immigrants were responsible for more than half of the start-up launches in Silicon Valley between...
  • Rewriting musical history: Mace's discovery proves Hensel's compositional authorship. Credit: Megan Morr
When Angela Mace A.M. ’08 sat down at a piano in the Nelson Music Room in early September, she awakened a forgotten bit of musical history. The sonata she played, a lyrical nineteenth-century...
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In his new book, Alexander to Constantine, Eric Meyers argues that Hellenism gave Judaism, and later Christianity, a cultural vehicle for expressing the faiths to worldwide audiences. Meyers, the...
  • Stormy times: Can The Tempest teach students about market behavior? istockphoto
On the surface, it’s not unusual that John Forlines III assigns his students to read Julius Caesar. It is, after all, one of the great literary works in history.But Forlines ’77, J.D. ’82 is an...
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Duke has cemented its place as the primary keeper of John Hope Franklin’s legacy with the acquisition of the late historian and former Duke professor’s personal papers.The collection, filling more...
  • Credit: Associated Press
The catalyst: Associate professor of literature Negar Mottahedeh conceived the idea for the course after the 2009 post-election crisis in Iran, when protesters used sites such as Twitter, Balatarin...
Surrounded by a thick, green blanket of Amazonian rainforest, Iquitos, Peru, is the largest city in the world that cannot be reached by roads. Only a small airport and the Amazon River, which snakes...

Ideas

While it may taste good on a hot dog, mustard's spice is actually a form of chemical warfare - a tangy bit of self-preservation mustard plants mount to discourage hungry insects. But, as any mustard...
When scientists at the Duke Cancer Institute launched a study exploring the biochemical changes inside brain tumors, they weren’t thinking about how to make a better windbreaker. But in a...
Before arriving at Duke in July 2010 as an assistant professor of public policy, Hal Brands had been sifting through documents captured after the fall of Saddam Hussein’s regime in Iraq for the...
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It takes brains to be good at math - as in, two halves of one brain, working together. That's the conclusion of Joonkoo Park, a postdoctoral fellow in Duke's Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, who...
  • Going with the flow: Ecohydrologists Martin Doyle, Brian McGlynn, Marco Marani, and Jim Heffernan in the Eno River. Credit: Les Todd
A river cuts across a landscape, meandering past cities and farms, collecting rainfall and runoff, and supporting all manner of life. Since the beginning of civilization, humans have depended on...

Observer

  • Roughing it: Kavya Durbha (in pink jacket) and her fellow PWILDers assess their location on a topographic map. Credit: Doug Clark
Kavya Durbha ’16 struggled down a natural stairway of rocks and roots through a rhododendron forest. Drizzle glanced off her waterproof jacket. Her boots skidded in mud, her thirty pound wilderness...

Muse

  • Epps and Saunders (Courtesy Jami Saunders)
Family Weekend stars Matthew Modine and Kristin Chenowith as workaholic parents whose sixteen year-old daughter (Olesya Rulin) holds them hostage in order to gain their attention and bring the...
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"Our city attracts more than its share of journalists and bloggers, essayists, and advocates, historians, and slam poets," writes Durham City Council member and The Independent cofounder Steve...
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Opera singer: not the first career choice of your average Blue Devil. The typical opera singer, if there is such a thing, goes to conservatory, followed by a master's in singing, then a...

Sports

  • No I in tee: Tabria Williford and Maddy Haller in the team's “Compete” shirts [Photos: Jon Gardiner]
In spring 2010, the rising seniors of the Duke women’s soccer team were not pleased. The fall season had ended abruptly with back-to-back losses in the quarterfinals of the ACC tournament and the...

Forever Duke

  • Courtesy Gerson Lehman Group
Growing up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, Morgenstern was surrounded by a community willing to have difficult conversations about social issues, ones he saw playing out regularly on the basketball court (...
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Credit: Sarah DeragonTori Hogan ’04 had all good intentions when she traveled to Kenya as an intern for Save the Children. But during a classroom visit to ask refugee children about their needs, a...

Retro

  • A 1938 physical-education course required for graduation. Courtesy Duke University Archives
Title IX, the landmark federal legislation that celebrates its fortieth anniversary this year, marked a breakthrough for female athletes at Duke, opening the door to full participation in varsity...
  • Sharp pitch: Music department graduate students Karen Cook and Stephen Pysnik A.M. '10 play crumhorns from the instruments collection. [Credit: Les Todd]
In the late 1950s, an emerging early-music movement sought to develop a richer appreciation for the instruments and performance methods of centuries past. Musicologists delved into the difficulties...